The Boston Marathon Movie – Is It Too Soon?

I just came across the trailer for the movie Patriots Day. For those of you runners out there that are not movie buffs, Patriots Day is based on the story of the bombing at the Boston Marathon in April 2013 and the manhunt that followed. I’ve watched the trailer twice now and I have mixed feelings on it.

I can’t deny that the movie looks like it is well made and will keep audiences entertained. However, I find the cynic in me viewing the studio making this movie guilty of playing on our emotional connection to this event. Knowing that our connection to our sport and this tragedy will draw large audiences and garauntee a huge return at the box office. At least they cast Mark Walberg,  a Boston native, to play the lead roll. Mark Walberg isn’t the greatest actor, but, I’ll be damned if he isn’t one of the most entertaining actors working today.

What are your thoughts on Hollywood churning out a film about the Boston Marathon bombing just 3.5 years after the tragic event occurred? Do you think the film was made to honor the victims and to celebrate the human spirit that was displayed by the runners, first responders, and spectators, or is Hollywood looking to make a quick buck off of this tragedy?

Patriots Day Movie One Sheet

 

 

The Day After Your Marathon

Here’s a quick post to help all of you that are recovering from running marathon this weekend smile…

While getting gas and a 5 Hour Energy to fuel my drive home from St. George after Saturday’s marathon, the gas station clerk mentioned how gross she thought 5 Hour Energy tasted. I readily agreed with her assessment of 5 Hour Energy’s horrid flavor, but told her that I needed it to keep me awake on my drive home due to how tired I was from running the marathon the day before.

As soon as I mentioned that I had run the marathon, the gas station clerk to the left of the one that was helping me shouted out, “the day after the marathon!”

I chuckled and said, “what?”

“You’ve never seen the YouTube video “The Day After The Marathon?” the woman said in disbelief.

I smiled and told her that I had never seen the video. The clerk responded but telling me that I MUST watch the video as soon as I got home.

Intrigued by the fact that there was a humorous video about running that I had never seen, I looked up the video this afternoon. The gas station clerk was right! This video is all too real for those of us out there who are currently recovering or have ever recovered from a marathon. Click play on the video below and have a good laugh. Even if you have seen this video before, it definitely warrants repeat viewings. Enjoy!

Should We Cheer For Galen Rupp in Rio?

I can say, without a doubt, that for me, the most exciting moment of the 2012 London Olympic Games was the final 3 laps of the Men’s 10,000 meters final.

As the final laps of the race began, Alberto Salazar’s protege, Galen Rupp, a 26 year old American was still hanging in with the older, more experienced, Kenyan and Ethiopian runners. Rupp patiently held his position in the middle of the lead pack for another 2.5 laps; and then, with 200 meters left in the race, he unleashed a perfectly timed finishing kick and surged past everyone except his friend and training partner Mo Farah. Farah won the gold medal and  Rupp won the silver medal.

Rupp’s silver medal was the first medal won by an American in the 10,000 meters in 48 years. The moment that Galen Rupp crossed the finish line in second place, he instantly changed the dialogue about the ability of a native born American runner being able to compete against the best distance runners in the World. For the first time in decades, the future of American distance running looked bright.

Unfortunately, the hope of a bright future that Galen Rupp brought to American distance running began to dim all to soon. On June 3rd, 2015 a report surfaced that accused Alberto Salazar of giving the runners that he coached, including Galen Rupp, performance enhancing drugs.

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